Cartagena (Spain)
11/15/2019 12:00 AM
11/15/2019 12:00 AM

Optional Private Excursions available for purchase

Avoid the crowds and hustle and bustle associated with a group activity. For a memorable trip ashore, we invite you to consider a private shore excursion. Enjoy the undivided attention of your own driver/guide and the flexibility of experiencing the aspects of the local culture that most interest you. Below are just some samples of the private shore excursions we can arrange for you. Give us a call or email us. Let us personalize your experience!

Cartagena: Murcia & Cartagena Full Day Excursion
Visit Cartagena with the Sea Wall, the roman theatre, the modernist architecture, the cathedral from the 13th century, the old quarter, City Hall square and Naval museum. Then drive for 45 minutes to the capital city of Murcia to visit the cathedral, Episcopal palace, the church of la Merced & the Salzillo museum.

8 hour tour
Morning or tour
No wheelchair
Light physical activity
Pick up and drop off at the Port

Included: Transportation by Deluxe Vehicle; Guided Tour; Entrance Fees

Not Included: Any meals or other services not specified


 
The entrance to the town center of Cartagena is dominated by the Palacio Consistorial or City Hall, a gem of modernist architecture from the early 20th century. On the way to the Torres Park (behind the Sea Wall) is the Old Cathedral. It is the oldest church in Cartagena (13th century), whose remains stand on the steps of a Roman Theatre discovered in 1987. This structure dates from the 1st century BC and is one of the most important in Spain along with the theatre in Mérida. Other fine examples of the city's Roman splendour are the remains of the Amphitheatre (in the Bullring), the Molinete Archaeological Zone, the Colonnade of the Lower Moorish Quarter and the Byzantine Wall, which, despite its name, is also Roman. In Torres Park is the Castle of la Concepción. Standing on a hill, it has been a fortress of Carthaginians, Romans, Visigoths, Arabs and Castilians.
 
To see Cartagena's modernist architecture, take a walk around calle Mayor, which starts at City Hall Square, and the surrounding streets. Gathered here are the Casa Cervantes and Casa Llagostera, works by the Cartagena architect Victor Beltrí, whose characteristic features are miradors, ironwork and bronze reliefs of allegorical figures. Other buildings representing this artistic trend are the Casino, the Gran Hotel, the Train Station and the Casa Maestre and Casa Dorda. Next to the walled historic quarter is the Military Arsenal, completed during the reign of Carlos III. 
 
Although the lands of Murcia have been populated for more than 2,000 years, the foundation of Murcia capital did not come until 831, when the emir of Córdoba Abd-al-Rahman II ordered a walled city to be built on the banks of the river Segura and made it into the capital of the caliph's province.
 
The old city sits next to the Segura, with historic streets which have retained the names of the guilds which once occupied them, such as the shopping streets of Platería, Trapería and Vidrieros (Silversmiths, Rags and Glass makers).
The square of Cardinal Belluga houses two of Murcia capital's architectural gems, the Episcopal Palace (18th century), with a rococo façade and a churrigueresque courtyard, and the Cathedral. This temple, which was begun at the end of the 14th century, stands out because of the superimposition of styles. Drawing attention, for example, is its singular and richly-sculptured baroque façade, and, along with it, the tremendous tower measuring 92 meters in height. Outstanding on the inside, meanwhile, is the Vélez Chapel, a magnificent example of the florid Gothic style.
The baroque style is well-represented in Murcia through religious buildings such as the church of la Merced, originally from the 16th century and rebuilt in the 18th century), the convent church of Santa Ana, the church of Santo Domingo, San Nicolás or San Miguel.
It is also worth seeing some of the city's more significant 19th-century buildings. The City Hall, the Romea Theatre and the Casino. This last building has a Neoclassic façade and a beautiful Arab-influenced interior courtyard. The Salzillo Museum contains a delightful collection of processional carvings by one of the most emblematic sculptors of the 18th century.

 
Cartagena: Historical Half Day City Tour

Visit the Sea Wall, the roman theatre, the modernist architecture, the cathedral from the 13th century, the old quarter, City Hall square and Naval museum.

3 hours tour
Morning or afternoon tour
No wheelchair
Light physical activity
Pick up and drop off at the Port 

Included: Transportation by Deluxe Vehicle; Guided Tour; Entrance Fees

Not Included: Any meals or other services not specified



Carthaginians and Romans took an interest in this maritime enclave, from whose Latin title, Cartago Nova, comes its current name. Cartagena was also under Arab domination until Fernando III the Saint reconquered it and incorporated it into the kingdom of Castile. Its port was hugely important in the War of Spanish Succession and the in the War of Independence.

The Sea Wall, built by Carlos III (18th century), marks the boundaries of its historic quarter. Facing the Mediterranean are two features which are clearly linked to the sea: the prototype submarine designed by the inventor from Cartagena Isaac Peral and the National Museum of Maritime Archaeology. This museum, on the Navidad dyke, also houses the National Centre of Underwater Archaeological Investigation. Through its discoveries, we can learn about aspects of naval construction, trade and navigation developed in the ancient world.


The entrance to the town centre is dominated by the Palacio Consistorial or City Hall, a gem of modernist architecture from the early 20th century. On the way to the Torres Park (behind the Sea Wall) is the Old Cathedral. It is the oldest church in Cartagena (13th century), whose remains stand on the steps of a Roman Theatre discovered in 1987. This structure dates from the 1st century BC and is one of the most important in Spain along with the theatre in Mérida. Other fine examples of the city's Roman splendour are the remains of the Amphitheatre (in the Bullring), the Molinete Archaeological Zone, the Colonnade of the Lower Moorish Quarter and the Byzantine Wall, which, despite its name, is also Roman. In Torres Park is the Castle of la Concepción. Standing on a hill, it has been a fortress of Carthaginians, Romans, Visigoths, Arabs and Castilians.


To see Cartagena's modernist architecture, take a walk around calle Mayor, which starts at City Hall Square, and the surrounding streets. Gathered here are the Casa Cervantes and Casa Llagostera, works by the Cartagena architect Victor Beltrí, whose characteristic features are miradors, ironwork and bronze reliefs of allegorical figures. Other buildings representing this artistic trend are the Casino, the Gran Hotel, the Train Station and the Casa Maestre and Casa Dorda. Next to the walled historic quarter is the Military Arsenal, completed during the reign of Carlos III. Also linked to the history of Cartagena, you can visit the Naval Museum, on the edge of the modern city. Exhibited here are navigating instruments from ancient vessels, maps and charts, alongside models of all kinds of ships. It is also worth visiting the fishing district of Santa Lucía.

Destination Guide