Palamos
05/26/2020 12:00 AM
05/26/2020 12:00 AM

Optional Private Excursions available for purchase

Avoid the crowds and hustle and bustle associated with a group activity. For a memorable trip ashore, we invite you to consider a private shore excursion. Enjoy the undivided attention of your own driver/guide and the flexibility of experiencing the aspects of the local culture that most interest you. Below are just some samples of the private shore excursions we can arrange for you. Give us a call or email us. Let us personalize your experience!

Palamos: Girona Full Day Excursion
Drive to Girona to visit this important medieval city, with the Call Jewish quarter, the Bonastruc ça Porta Jewish center, located in the emblematic building that housed the last synagogue of Girona. It is currently the home of the Museum of the History of the Jews and the Nahmanides Institute for Jewish studies. The Arab baths, the gothic Cathedral and the Monastery of Sant Pere de Galligants.   

7 hour tour

Morning tour
No wheelchair
Light physical activity
Pick up and drop off at the Port

Included: Transportation by Deluxe Vehicle; Guided Tour; Entrance Fees

Not Included: Any meals or other services not specified


                
The so-called “City of the Four Rivers”, shows us a historic center dominated by medieval buildings and reminders of Romans, Arabs and Jews. Inside the walled enclosure of "La Força Vella" you can find the culminating works of its historical destiny. One of the rivers, the Onyar, divides the historic center from the modern city.

The old center of this Catalan city preserves remains of its long history, from the time it was founded by the Romans in the 1st century B.C.  To them we owe its original wall, whose remains stretch from the Archaeological Walk to the Wall Gardens.

Set in this walled enclosure (La Força Vella), stands the Cathedral. Its Romanesque origin is shown in its fortress-like appearance and strategic location, although the most outstanding aspect is an immense Gothic nave, the widest in Medieval European architecture. Inside, it preserves one of the textile jewels of Catalan Romanesque, the Creation Tapestry.
Girona has other key pieces of religious architecture, like the Benedictine monastery of Sant Pere de Galligants. The convent of Sant Doménech, built in Gothic style and clear example of the importance of the religious orders in the colonization and re-population of Catalonia during the Middle Ages, stands amid gardens.

This historical period is also home to important displays of Arab and Jewish art, the result of these cultures living side-by-side with Christianity for centuries. You will discover the multitude of small streets making up El Call, the Jewish quarter of Girona. Calle Força is the heart of this district, which had a synagogue and Cabbalistic studies in the Bonastruc Saporta center. The Call is currently one of the best preserved Jewish quarters in Spain.

In the 12th century, Jews moved to a lower part of the city. In 1160 they were already inhabiting the Call, the name given to Jewish quarters in Catalonia. It is a name coming from Latin "callis" (street), which would become carrer in Catalan and calle in Spanish. In medieval times, call meant a "group of narrow streets". These paved, narrow streets constituted the urban space where most of the Jewish population in Girona settled in the 13th and 14th centuries. The community's main body was formed by tradesmen and craftsmen: tailors, shoemakers, weavers, barbers, furriers, blacksmiths, goldsmiths and silversmiths opened their workshops in the Call´s narrow streets. Others devoted their time to medicine and astrology, while those who had the means became money-lenders.

In Girona, there is The Bonastruc ça Porta Centre, located in the emblematic building that housed the last synagogue of Girona, is currently the home of the Museum of the History of the Jews and the Nahmanides Institute for Jewish studies.
Not far from here, a Capuchin convent houses the Arab Baths, where we should point out a pavilion built on eight fine columns and crowned by an octagonal cupola. 
Palamos: Girona & Dali Figueres Full Day Excursion
Drive to Girona to visit this important medieval city, with the old Call Jewish quarter, the Bonastruc ça Porta Jewish center, the arab baths and the gothic cathedral. Afterwards to Figueres to visit the Dali fascinating surrealist Theater-museum, a monument to the artist´s fervid imagination.  

9 hour tour

Morning tour
No wheelchair
Moderate physical activity
Pick up and drop off at the Port 

Included: Transportation by Deluxe Vehicle; Guided Tour; Entrance Fees

Not Included: Any meals or other services not specified



The so-called “City of the Four Rivers”, shows us a historic center dominated by medieval buildings and reminders of Romans, Arabs and Jews. Inside the walled enclosure of "La Força Vella" you can find the culminating works of its historical destiny. One of the rivers, the Onyar, divides the historic center from the modern city.

The old center of this Catalan city preserves remains of its long history, from the time it was founded by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. To them we owe its original wall, whose remains stretch from the Archaeological Walk to the Wall Gardens.

Set in this walled enclosure (La Força Vella), stands the Cathedral. Its Romanesque origin is shown in its fortress-like appearance and strategic location, although the most outstanding aspect is an immense Gothic nave, the widest in Medieval European architecture. Inside, it preserves one of the textile jewels of Catalan Romanesque, the Creation Tapestry.

To this historical period belongs important displays of Arab and Jewish art, the result of these cultures living side-by-side with Christianity for centuries. So, you will discover the multitude of small streets making up El Call, the Jewish quarter of Girona. Calle Força is the heart of this district, which had a synagogue and centres of cabbalistic studies in the Bonastruc Saporta center. The Call is currently one of the best preserved Jewish quarters in Spain.
Nearby, a Capuchin convent houses the Arab Baths, where we should point out a pavilion built on eight fine columns and crowned by an octagonal cupola.

Figueres, county capital of Alt Empordà, extends over a river plain situated inland in the province of Girona. Known as the home of Salvador Dalí, this town with deep Catalan roots offers visitors the chance to go to the Dalí Theatre-Museum, dedicated to the genius of surrealist painting.

The Dalí Theatre-Museum is without doubt, one of the historical milestones that has left the greatest mark on the character of the town. Situated in the old municipal theatre, is one of the main cultural places to see in the city. Designed by the artist himself, it holds an important exhibition, which, through numerous works, allows you to take a trip through the career of the main considered a master of Surrealism. The site was extended with the Torre Galatea, where the artistic genius died. 
Palamos: Barcelona Full Day Excursion
Visit the Santa Eulalia Cathedral, the Gothic and Jewish Quarter, the old Synagogue and Las Ramblas walking promenade. Drive to the Montjuic Mountain with lovely views over the city and Ports, and afterwards to the Sagrada Familia church inside (The Temple of the Holy Family).

9 hour tour

Morning tour
No wheelchair
Light physical activity
Pick up and drop off at the Port

Included: Transportation by Deluxe Vehicle; Guided Tour; Entrance Fees

Not Included: Any meals or other services not specified



The cathedral is situated on the site of a Paleochristian basilica. Construction began during the Romanesque period but was finally completed during the Gothic period, which is the dominant style. The interior naves are at nearly the same height, which causes the impression of being in a single site. The dome base is covered on the inside with handcrafted woodwork. The door from the cloister to the cathedral and the chapel of Santa Lucía are of great interest.
 
Its early city center, which was surrounded by walls during Roman times, makes up what today is the Gothic Quarter. Narrow streets, with quiet squares and attractive corners, are home to an abundant collection of Gothic buildings, both civil and religious. Surrounding Barcelona's impressive gothic Cathedral, medieval palaces emerge, such as Casa dels Canonges and Casa d´Ardiaca. The Plaça del Rei brings together another labyrinth of marvelous buildings, such as the Palau Reial Mayor and the Chapel of Santa Ágata. The Plaça Sant Jaume holds the Palau de la Generalitat (headquarters of the Catalan government) and the City Hall.

The urban development of the central area of Barcelona was defined, towards the end of the 19th century, by the Eixample (urban expansion). An extensive grid, with large avenues and chamfered corners, joined the irregular layouts of old districts and outlying towns to the surrounding hills. The emerging Catalonian bourgeoisie chose this place to build its mansions and palaces, following the most daring principles of Modernism. Works by Gaudí, such Casa Milà “La Pedrera”, Casa Batlló and the temple of the Sagrada Familia (the Holy Family) are just a few of the many modernist gems treasured by the city.

One of the main arteries of the historic quarter, La Rambla, leads to the Mediterranean Sea, and it is one of the best places to catch the rhythm of the city. The visitor is led through its different sections, from the Romanesque church of Santa Anna, to the bird and flower stalls, passing gorgeous examples of Baroque and Renaissance architecture on the way.

Some of these modern facilities are the inheritance from the 1992 Olympics. Their mark can also be seen on the hill at Montjuïc, beside the monumental work from the 1929 World Exhibition. The Plaça d'Espanya, the Magic Fountain, the Palau Nacional and the Olympic Ring are a few of its most important works. The Olympic Stadium, the Calatrava Tower and the Sant Jordi Sports Center.

On today’s l’Arc de Sant Ramon Street –then Escola dels Franceses or dels Banys Freds (Cold Baths)– the Synagogue was erected with permission in 1306, bringing together the residents of French origin. The site of the older Call of Barcelona –the Call Major– is located between l’Arc de Sant Ramon, Call, Bisbe and Sant Sever Streets. In the mid-13th century, the geographic space designated to the Jewish community was amplified. On the outskirts of what is today the Church of Sant Jaume, the Call Menor (Minor) sprouted and thrived.

Destination Guide